The Art of Gardening All Winter Long On Schedule

The Art of Gardening All Winter Long On Schedule

I have to confess my undying love for fall and winter gardening. In fact, I nearly prefer it to most of the gardening we do during the summer!

Today, I want to share with you some of my plans for gardening this coming fall and winter seasonal period. I want to give you some of my personal inspiration for both crops and layout. I am also going to share details of a typical sowing schedule for my fall and winter crops, of course depending on when your own fall frost starts.

In case you need any help keeping things organized on your side, don’t forget to check out my own garden planning printables. Here, I have detailed everything to help you out. All you need to do is just fill out your own sowing schedules, keep track of frosting dates, as well as the kind of crops you are growing in each of your garden beds. Everything else is just set out for your use.

The Art of Gardening All Winter Long On ScheduleGardening plans for fall and winter:

In this section, we discuss some visual gardening plans for fall and winter. I want to inspire you into creating something similar or even better. You can still have your own fall or winter garden whichever size of land you want to utilize. Don’t worry even if you have a limited amount of space.

My first example of a garden plan shows you the kind of crops you can grow even when you just have some containers. The second example is a garden bed while the third and last one is a couple of prepared garden beds. And for those of us who wish to take the growing season further and deeper into the winter months, you can expand your gardening to have many beds by adding season extenders.

Learn more about my winter gardening and how to effectively apply the season extenders concept right here. I have done this for some time and I have some experience that you can take advantage of.

When is the most ideal time to sow fall and winter gardening crops?

One important thing you need to keep in mind when creating your first sowing schedule for fall and winter gardening regards frosting dates. From the climate of your area, what dates are you expecting the first fall frost? For us, this could be anywhere between September 5th and October 15th.

The good news is that most fall and winter crop types are frost-hardy. They can easily handle light freezes and a decelerated rate of growth with shortened daylight time. If you are aware of the frost dates for your area, you can easily count back the weeks for the crops below. Remember, if you are growing greens, it is possible to harvest at multiple life stages with good harvests every time. Other crops such as cabbages and root veggies require more time to reach the right maturity for harvesting. In the case of these latter crops, you may need to apply succession sowing if you want to get the timing right for harvesting them.

Here I present you an approximate sowing schedule detailing the timelines for sowing your fall and winter crops. But before we go any further, I would like to remind you to check the dates indicated on your seed packets. This is because some crops such as carrots, for instance, can grow and mature as quickly as 55 days (a good example here is the hybrid Napoli carrots which would be an excellent pick for your fall and winter gardening) or as long as 110 days (for example the Autumn King winter carrots).

NB: Some garden crops, if sown too early, could bolt if they encounter too much of the summer heat. Such are better off with a delayed sowing.

Sow as many of such fall and winter crops as possible in your gardening space and do it multiple times rather than of all at once. Use succession planting for any greens so as to spread out your harvesting as I have mentioned earlier. Another advantage of this style of sowing greens is that it tremendously lowers the risk of losing your crops to bolting in the weather fluctuates along the way.

Personally, I begin my succession planting cycle from between early August and mid-August and keep sowing till around mid-October under season extenders. The plan here is to have later sowings overwinter for my harvest during the early days of spring.

Another thing to remember: Boost the nutrients of your garden soil prior to planting by using compost. This gives the nutrients enough time to mix with the soil before the crops can come in. I also have to caution you with fertilizers: normally, artificial fertilizers aren’t as good as compost nutrients in the fall since the uptake of the former is much slower due to the fact that soils are colder at this time.

Your later sowings should be baby greens, for instance, kales, Swiss chard, etc.

16+ weeks prior to the first fall frost, you can sow the following crops:

– Winter Cabbages;

– Leeks;

– Parsnips;

– Brussel Sprouts.

12 weeks prior to the first fall frost; sow the crops below:

– Swiss Chard;

– Beets;

– Kale;

– Cabbages;

– Collard;

– Chinese Cabbages;

– Turnips

– Carrots;

– Kohl Rabi;

– Green Onions;

– Winter Radishes;

– Raddichio.

8 weeks before the arrival of the first fall frost; sow the following crops;

– Swiss Chard;

– Endive;

– Beets;

– Kales;

– Mustard Greens;

– Radishes;

– Spinach;

– Kohl Rabi;

– Winter lettuce;

– Asian Crops;

– Baby Turnips.

6 weeks or so before the first fall frost; sow these crops:

– Kales;

– Winter lettuce;

– Radishes;

– Swiss Chard;

– Mache;

– Mustard Greens;

– Arugula;

– Spinach;

– Asian Crops;

– Endive.

4 weeks before the first fall frost arrives; sow the crops below:

(then also sow multiple times following the fall frost using the season extenders method for baby greens or to overwinter)

– Kales;

– Radishes;

– Arugula;

– Mustard Greens;

– Winter Lettuce;

– Spinach;

– Asian Crops;

– Mache.

It is my hope you found my article here informative. You are welcome again!

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